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Getting ready to put in the pond.

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1 Getting ready to put in the pond. on Sun Aug 22, 2010 9:46 am

bullfrog

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According to a pond calculator, if I make my pond 25 feet long, 10 feet wide and three feet deep, it will hold 5,611 gallons. this will require that my pump move 2,800 GPH. Iwant an oase but the strongest one that I can find only pumps 2,600 GPH. I do want a dependable pump that is energy efficient, any opinions?


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2 Re: Getting ready to put in the pond. on Sun Aug 22, 2010 10:15 am

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I went back and read, JW has a Pondmaster that has been working for 8 years? The one I need from them costs about $188.00, not bad.


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3 Re: Getting ready to put in the pond. on Sun Aug 22, 2010 12:53 pm

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I don't know about brands but I'm concerned about your considered pump size. I know that money is always a big part of the choice but UM-----I will never regret getting a bigger pump. OK, for one thing, my waterfall sounds GOOOOOOD because the pump pushes lots of water. For another thing, when my pond starts going green, I can filter it out quickly because it turns over so much so quickly. I put extra pieces of filter media in mesh baskets in the steps of the waterfall. A negative probably is that it costs more to run a bigger pump. I would guess my pond is less that 2,000 gallons and my first pump was a 3200 GPH. This one is 3,000. You'll never regret getting a larger pump but a smaller one,,,maybe.

Another thing to think about is either getting a pump with a float built in or installing a separate one so that if for some reason the water gets pumped out of the pond, you don't ruin your pump, lose all your water, and don't lose your fish. Yes, I know they reccommend the water turnover be every half hour but have had this pond about 8 years and it's clear most of the time and clears quickly when there is a problem. Oh an never put the pump at the bottom of your pond.

Also depth, I love being able to get in my pond and deadhead the done blossoms and yellowing lily pads. Mine is between 24" and 30". It allows me to work in it easily because I am short. My tip is to stand on the kitchen floor and bend over turning your head to the side as far as you can, while reaching down to touch the floor. Have Vicki measure the distance between your nose and the floor. That's how deep to make your pond. You can touch bottom without drowning. Sounds like a joke but "no". If I want to pick something off the bottom of my pond, I can. Another thing, get a regular swimming pool handle and leaf skimmer. You might want to add a layer of toule (tutu net fabric). I say the swimming pool handle because it adjusts waaaaaay out and you will be able to scoop the crud off the bottom from anywhere on the side of your pond, fish things off the bottom without getting in, and reach the whole surface of your pond bottom. The toule is a fine net and catches a lot of the gunk that goes through a regular leaf net.

There's a big controversy about plant ledges. I love my plant ledges. I put the lilies on the ledges when they first start in the spring and then drop some of them down to the bottom later. Also----I made a spot with steps going down in both ponds. I shaped the steps out of wet sand, layed cement patio blocks on the step and back, covered it all with carpet and then layed the liner over it. It is very easy to get in and out for me. Also, when I put the mini fence around the sides, I made sure to put one of the posts right at the side of the step top so I have something to grab and steady myself. But I have had what I think was a heron try to land on one of my pots. It was tipped into the pond. I have a small kind of decorative rope fence around the open sides of my pond with marginals growing up under it. Herons won't climb over or crawl under the fence. They don't like walking through tangly stuff either.

Another thing, don't make the bottom bowl shaped if you can avoid it. I think it is too hard to scoop the bottom and get as much of the leaves and gook off when the sides slant over to the bottom and then the bottom is curved. Also walking in it,,,,if you are planning on it, is nigh impossible when the bottom is gunky, which it usually is,,,, slippery as all get out. Just ask me how I know.

Another thing---lots of another things----buy a liner that is much bigger than you think you'll need. DO NOT CUT off the excess. Roll it down and under in case you need to change something around the edges, you can.

You're lucky there that you don't have to worry about freezing pipes. So run water pipes over close to your pond so you don't have to drag a hose out everytime you want to top off the pond or clean a filter. While you're digging, run your electric lines to more than one spot around the pond. At first, you'll find you want to plug in fountains, spitters, lights and all kinds of interesting electrical things. Most of all, BE SURE TO USE A GFI. Dont' want you frying your fish or yourself. We eventually put a patio alongside the pond so the electricity comes in handy.

Oh and look around before you start digging to find the nearest trees or bushes that drop leaves. Around here, I swear, leaves blow in from neighboring states. Seems that way anyway. There are oak trees up the road. They are tough and thick and don't decompose easily. They blow into the pond the next spring yet. The Maple leaves mat together and don't blow as easily after while.

Does Texas have rocks? Anyway, better start now getting the word around that you need rocks. Put a piece of plastic or rubber roofing in the trunk of your car and a small shovel. Watch along the roadsides and when noone is looking, grab the rocks. I like ones that are around 8"-10" and smaller. I find that after 8 years, I'm still adjusting the placement on them and want my rocks small enough for me to handle them. Stream beds are another place to find rocks. Farmers sometimes have rockpiles as they gather them from the fields to keep the equipment clear of them. And lastly, neighborhood lawns and parks usually have some nice ones.


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4 Re: Getting ready to put in the pond. on Sun Aug 22, 2010 12:59 pm

bullfrog

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I used the online pond calculator, I sure want enough pump.


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5 Re: Getting ready to put in the pond. on Mon Aug 23, 2010 8:51 am

bullfrog

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So far I'm looking at the Danner Pondmaster Hy Drive 4,800 GPH pump. It can be submersible or not. I will have it as an external. They didn't list the inlet/outlet size but a similar one had one inch openings. I'm a little concerned about this, necking down the piping. I had planned on using 1 1/2 to 2 inch PVC to do my plumbing. It still should deliver enough volume of water because even the Pondmaster X series, with a 2 inch suction/discharge notes that they are adapters. Is a one inch suction standard?

Also, I've decided on a Firestone 45 mil liner, it has a twenty year guaranty. A 15X30 roll is about $200.00 plus $99.00 for the padding.

I think I'll just use a swimming pool skimmer, a skimmer is a skimmer and I can't see spending $300.00 for a larger skimmer when a $45.00 one will do the same thing. I'll clean it often during the fall.

My neighbor has a backhoe and will dig it for free. I'll keep the topsoil for the planter boxes. I plan on a straight 3 foot depth due to all of the herons that we have in the area. I will just have to raise the plants on stands. The rocks are the most expensive things, we don't have large rocks in this area. But, just to make the waterfall shouldn't be that bad. Meanwhile, I'll keep my eyes peeled for rocks.

I will photograph it from step one and post the pictures.


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6 Re: Getting ready to put in the pond. on Mon Aug 23, 2010 1:06 pm

jw

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Esther has lots of good points and I wish I would have done lots of the things she recommended. I thought that one should always buy a pump gph bigger than the pond size. If your pond is over 5000 gals then shouldn't you have a pump that pumps more than that per hour? Esther is right about getting a bigger pump size than you need. The fence around the pond is a good thing to have also. I had to put one around mine along w/ the shrubs and so far the heron have stayed away now I have plant ledges around mine but I made them lower in the water and straight down so critters can't just wade in. My pond is about 3&1/2 ft deep but I have a long handled skimmer for scooping. It is a bummer to have to get in that deep water to get at the pads etc. but I wanted mine deeper so the fish would be able to hide better and also have cool water to go to in the summer and warmer water to go to in the winter. I don't have the fancy outside pond filter set up and wish I did cuz it would sure make it a lot easier to clean. Try to do everything right the first time and take your time thinking it out and asking questions and you will be happy in the end for it. No matter what you do you will be changing things around to your liking now and then. New ideas are always popping up and that's what makes it fun and challenging. Can't wait to see your progress pix from start to finish


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7 Re: Getting ready to put in the pond. on Mon Aug 23, 2010 5:16 pm

Esther


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So are you planning a waterfall? Part of the push is lost when the pump has to lift the water up to the waterfall. Planning a Skippy?
What about a bottom drain? I don't know anything about that stuff. I don't have one but my pond is small and I get along fine without it. Our setup is about as simple as they come. We didn't want to spend a bunch and have a big hole. I know that some day in a few years we'll have to sell this house and maybe the buyer won't want a pond. So Pete put all the dirt from the hole in a pile at the back of our lot.
The bigger the pond, the bigger the pump to pay for and pay to run, the more plants to take care of, the more fish to buy and take care of, the more water to pay for if you're on city water-----and it goes on and on. Who's going to take care of the fish when you have to go away for a period of time? Come to think of it, who takes care of your animals now when you go away?


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8 Re: Getting ready to put in the pond. on Wed Sep 08, 2010 12:51 am

Bullfrog-
I too have been researching pumps, and from what I can tell it seems to come down to amperage. The more amps the higher the light bill. My old submersible was 9 amps at 6800 gph. If I ran it 24-7, it would cost $75 a month! It did make a heck of a waterfall though. I used two 500gph submersibles to run the filter. They together cost about $10 a month to run. The external pumps I'm looking at right now cost more initially, but will save money in the long run. The sequence 1000 ($320) pumps out 3400 gph at 4' head and will cost about $11 a month. The pondmaster 4800($279) pumps 4100gph at 4' head and would cost me $17 a month to run. But the pondmaster is submersible which is tempting...
Happy pump searching!

Ok, apples to apples the PM 4000 ($239) pumps about 3100@4' and is $16 a month, which would cost $60 more a year to run than the comparable sequence. They both use an external drive, I guess the difference is that the PM might lose efficiency due to the seals...waterproofing... ex[dunno



Last edited by prestontolbert on Wed Sep 08, 2010 1:13 am; edited 1 time in total (Reason for editing : addendum)

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